3 ways to read in binary

3 ways to read in binary
3 ways to read in binary
Anonim

Trying to read a binary sequence made up of 1s and 0s may seem like an impossible task. With a little logic, it becomes easy to understand. Men easily integrated the 10-digit counting system, simply because we have 10 fingers. On the other hand, the computer has only two "fingers": the on and off positions, or 0 and 1, resulting in a two-digit system, the binary system.

Steps

Method 1 of 3: With the exhibitors

Step 1. Choose a binary number you want to convert

We will take for example: 101010.

Step 2. Multiply each binary digit by 2 to the power of its rank

Remember that the binary is read from right to left. The rightmost digit is considered a 0.

Step 3. Sum all the values

Going from right to left:

  • 0 × 20 = 0

  • 1 × 21 = 2
  • 0 × 22 = 0
  • 1 × 23 = 8
  • 0 × 24 = 0
  • 1 × 25 = 32
  • Total = 42

Method 2 of 3: Alternative format with exponents

Step 1. Choose a binary number you want to convert

We will take for example: 101. Here is a slight variation of the previous method. You may find this format easier to understand.

  • 101 = (1X2) power 2 + (0X2) power 1 + (1X2) power 0
  • 101 = (2X2) + (0X0) + (1)
  • 101= 4 + 0 + 1
  • 101= 5

    Note that the 'zero' is not a number, but its value should be noted

Method 3 of 3: cell values

Step 1. Choose a binary number

For example 00101010.

Step 2. Read from right to left

In each box, the values ​​double. So the first digit from the right is 1, the second is a 2, the third is a 4, and so on.

Step 3. Add up the “yes” values

The zeros take the corresponding value, but are not added.

  • So, in our example, that gives us: 2 + 8 + 32, for a result of 42.

    The 1 is equivalent to a "no", the 2 to a "yes", the 4 to a "no", the 8 to a "yes", the 16 to a "no", the 32 to a "yes", the 64 to a "no" and 128 to a "no". You must add the "yes" and skip the "no". You can stop at the last digit

Step 4. Note that the resulting number can be transformed into a letter or punctuation

In terms of punctuation, the 42 is equivalent to an asterisk (*). Click here for a table

Advice

  • The usual calculation rules also work for binary numbers. The rightmost digit increments one by one until it has reached its maximum (from 0 to 1) then the next digit increments one by one and we start from zero.
  • The numbers we used today respect positional notation. Suppose we are using integers, the rightmost digit represents ones, the next one tens and then hundreds, and so on. Positional notation for binary numbers begins with one, two, four, eight, etc.

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